Lanthorn December 14, 2009 : Page 1

Lanthorn anthorn Business College cover Lanthorn Business Business College covers loss of Promise for top students in need By Anya Zentmeyer GVL Staff Writer Late this semester, many students felt the brunt of the blow when the Michigan Promise Scholarship and Michigan Competitive Scholarship were taken away. Fortunately, for a select few students, the Seidman College of Business’ Dean’s Advisory Board will recognize the top students of greatest need with hopes to alleviate some of that financial burden with the S e i d m a n C o l l e g e S p e c i a l S t u d e n t Scholarship, which will award $500 to the top 20 Seidman students. “ T h e r e “So we’re kind of just stepping up when things got tough ... “ MARK OLESNAVAGE DEAN’S ADVISORY BOARD CHAIRPERSON were- about 900 people in the sort of ‘universe’ that we looked at, and we looked at students that not only lost out on Michigan Competitive Scholarship, but the Michigan Promise Scholarship, too, since they got hit double,” said Mark Olesnavage, chairperson of the DAB. “I think there was 900 plus of those students in that category. Then they sorted based on financial need and performance and came up with a group of 20 students. The scholarship is $500 to each student.” Vonnie Herrera, director of external relations and ommunications at the Seidman School of Business, said the board is also looking to establish another scholarship that will allocate $4,000 to students each year. “A Scholarship Committee c omp r i s e d of m e m b e r s is board being ident i f ied,” H e r r e r a said. “Tha c ommi t t e e w i l d e t e r m i n e the criteria for these new awards and will likely recommend that ‘Leadership Scholarships’ be granted to Seidman business students beginning with the fall semester of 2010.” The money for the scholarship will not come from the school’s budget but rather from the pockets of those on the board. The dues, essentially donations, each Advisory Board member pays every year to support various activities for the board will fund the scholarships. “The idea came from a discussion we had in terms of how tough things were for students and how scholarships were scarce and being pulled away from the people who needed it,” Olesnavage said. “And James Williams and the Dean’s Advisory Board went over the situation and saw how tough it was on students and we all thought, ‘Hey, we should do something.’” Olesnavage said the board recognizes this does not make everything right for students, given the total expense of school, but does hope it will help students financially, as well as show students the board wants them to stay in school See Scholarships, A2 GVL / Mark Andrus Students celebrate as they walk across the stage to signify their graduation. INDEX A GVL / Mark Andrus GVSU President Thomas J. Haas congratulates students as he hands them their diplomas. About 900 students completed their degrees in the fall 2009 semester. The commencement ceremony took place at the Van Andel Arena on Saturday. Fall commencement boasts 900 grads By Nadira Kharmai GVL Staff Writer Words of encouragement are expected at any graduation ceremony. The themes of this semester’s commencement last Saturday not only included encouraging words but also a request for graduating students to continue their initiatives of success and education. “We must here at GVSU comes into play throughout life,” Hardy said. Hardy’s love and appreciation to the university is similar to the sentiments of many alumni. S h a r o n “Everything you experience at GVSU comes into play throughout life.” TROY A. HARDY RECIPIENT OF DISTINGUISHED ALUMNUS AWARD transform Michigan for the better with risk-taking and collaboration,” said this year’s commenceme Sue Coleman. Coleman, Business College covers loss of Promise for top students in need By Anya Zentmeyer GVL Staff Writer Late this semester, many students felt the brunt of the blow when the Michigan Promise Scholarship and Michigan Competitive Scholarship were taken away. Fortunately, for a select few students, the Seidman College of Business’ Dean’s Advisory Board will recognize the top students of greatest need with hopes to alleviate some of that financial burden with the S e i d m a n C o l l e g e S p e c i a l S t u d e n t Scholarship, which will award $500 to the top 20 Seidman students. “ T h e r e “So we’re kind of just stepping up when things got tough ... “ MARK OLESNAVAGE DEAN’S ADVISORY BOARD CHAIRPERSON were- about 900 people in the sort of ‘universe’ that we looked at, and we looked at students that not only lost out on Michigan Competitive Scholarship, but the Michigan Promise Scholarship, too, since they got hit double,” said Mark Olesnavage, chairperson of the DAB. “I think there was 900 plus of those students in that category. Then they sorted based on financial need and performance and came up with a group of 20 students. The scholarship is $500 to each student.” Vonnie Herrera, director of external relations and ommunications at the Seidman School of Business, said the board is also looking to establish another scholarship that will allocate $4,000 to students each year. “A Scholarship Committee c omp r i s e d of m e m b e r s is board being ident i f ied,” H e r r e r a said. “Tha c ommi t t e e w i l d e t e r m i n e the criteria for these new awards and will likely recommend that ‘Leadership Scholarships’ be granted to Seidman business students beginning with the fall semester of 2010.” The money for the scholarship will not come from the school’s budget but rather from the pockets of those on the board. The dues, essentially donations, each Advisory Board member pays every year to support various activities for the board will fund the scholarships. “The idea came from a discussion we had in terms of how tough things were for students and how scholarships were scarce and being pulled away from the people who needed it,” Olesnavage said. “And James Williams and the Dean’s Advisory Board went over the situation and saw how tough it was on students and we all thought, ‘Hey, we should do something.’” Olesnavage said the board recognizes this does not make everything right for students, given the total expense of school, but does hope it will help students financially, as well as show students the board wants them to stay in school See Scholarships, A2 GVL / Mark Andrus Students celebrate as they walk across the stage to signify their graduation. INDEX A GVL / Mark Andrus GVSU President Thomas J. Haas congratulates students as he hands them their diplomas. About 900 students completed their degrees in the fall 2009 semester. The commencement ceremony took place at the Van Andel Arena on Saturday. Fall commencement boasts 900 grads By Nadira Kharmai GVL Staff Writer Words of encouragement are expected at any graduation ceremony. The themes of this semester’s commencement last Saturday not only included encouraging words but also a request for graduating students to continue their initiatives of success and education. “We must here at GVSU comes into play throughout life,” Hardy said. Hardy’s love and appreciation to the university is similar to the sentiments of many alumni. S h a r o n “Everything you experience at GVSU comes into play throughout life.” TROY A. HARDY RECIPIENT OF DISTINGUISHED ALUMNUS AWARD transform Michigan for the better with risk-taking and collaboration,” said this year’s commenceme Sue Coleman. Coleman, president president of Michigan-Ann the economic “Michigan n and skills of to turn the sta President also encourag confident and making changes.” The ceremony its theme recognizing th music editor with the Dist Award. During commencement, his accomplis his achieveme State University. “Everything you experience LaChappelle who sat in the crowd to watch her son Levi receive his diploma also spoke about her appreciation for GVSU, which is her alma mater. In 1997, she earned her bachelor’s degree and in 2004, her master’s. “I enjoyed my experience at horn Business College covers loss of Promise for top students in need By Anya Zentmeyer GVL Staff Writer Late this semester, many students felt the brunt of the blow when the Michigan Promise Scholarship and Michigan Competitive Scholarship were taken away. Fortunately, for a select few students, the Seidman College of Business’ Dean’s Advisory Board will recognize the top students of greatest need with hopes to alleviate some of that financial burden with the S e i d m a n C o l l e g e S p e c i a l S t u d e n t Scholarship, which will award $500 to the top 20 Seidman students. “ T h e r e “So we’re kind of just stepping up when things got tough ... “ MARK OLESNAVAGE DEAN’S ADVISORY BOARD CHAIRPERSON were- about 900 people in the sort of ‘universe’ that we looked at, and we looked at students that not only lost out on Michigan Competitive Scholarship, but the Michigan Promise Scholarship, too, since they got hit double,” said Mark Olesnavage, chairperson of the DAB. “I think there was 900 plus of those students in that category. Then they sorted based on financial need and performance and came up with a group of 20 students. The scholarship is $500 to each student.” Vonnie Herrera, director of external relations and ommunications at the Seidman School of Business, said the board is also looking to establish another scholarship that will allocate $4,000 to students each year. “A Scholarship Committee c omp r i s e d of m e m b e r s is board being ident i f ied,” H e r r e r a said. “Tha c ommi t t e e w i l d e t e r m i n e the criteria for these new awards and will likely recommend that ‘Leadership Scholarships’ be granted to Seidman business students beginning with the fall semester of 2010.” The money for the scholarship will not come from the school’s budget but rather from the pockets of those on the board. The dues, essentially donations, each Advisory Board member pays every year to support various activities for the board will fund the scholarships. “The idea came from a discussion we had in terms of how tough things were for students and how scholarships were scarce and being pulled away from the people who needed it,” Olesnavage said. “And James Williams and the Dean’s Advisory Board went over the situation and saw how tough it was on students and we all thought, ‘Hey, we should do something.’” Olesnavage said the board recognizes this does not make everything right for students, given the total expense of school, but does hope it will help students financially, as well as show students the board wants them to stay in school See Scholarships, A2 GVL / Mark Andrus Students celebrate as they walk across the stage to signify their graduation. INDEX A GVL / Mark Andrus GVSU President Thomas J. Haas congratulates students as he hands them their diplomas. About 900 students completed their degrees in the fall 2009 semester. The commencement ceremony took place at the Van Andel Arena on Saturday. Fall commencement boasts 900 grads By Nadira Kharmai GVL Staff Writer Words of encouragement are expected at any graduation ceremony. The themes of this semester’s commencement last Saturday not only included encouraging words but also a request for graduating students to continue their initiatives of success and education. “We must here at GVSU comes into play throughout life,” Hardy said. Hardy’s love and appreciation to the university is similar to the sentiments of many alumni. S h a r o n “Everything you experience at GVSU comes into play throughout life.” TROY A. HARDY RECIPIENT OF DISTINGUISHED ALUMNUS AWARD transform Michigan for the better with risk-taking and collaboration,” said this year’s commenceme Sue Coleman. Coleman, president of Michigan-Ann the economic “Michigan n and skills of to turn the sta President also encourag confident and making changes.” The ceremony its theme recognizing th music editor with the Dist Award. During commencement, his accomplis his achieveme State University. “Everything you experience LaChappelle who sat in the crowd to watch her son Levi receive his diploma also spoke about her appreciation for GVSU, which is her alma mater. In 1997, she earned her bachelor’s degree and in 2004, her master’s. “I enjoyed my experience at GVSU GVSU leads Michigan schools in number of degrees awarded Last semester’s commencement ceremony marked a milestone for Grand Valley State University, which continued on Saturday, as the university recorded the greatest increase in the number of graduates during the past 10 years compared to other Michigan schools. The Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System Completion Survey released the data on Nov. 30. For the 1998-99 school year, GVSU awarded 2,478 degrees, which increased to 4,754 in 2008-09, for a 91.8 percent growth. “Grand Valley’s GVL / Mark Andrus Mary Sue Coleman, president of U-M- Ann Arbor, spoke at commencement. accomplishment is all the more remarkable because the university’s graduation increases have come at a time when state aid has dropped dramatically and our tuition held to a rate below the state average,” said GVSU President Thomas J. Haas in a press release. While GVSU currently enrolls 24,408 students, with a student body growth rate of about 42 percent for the past 10 years, the number of graduates has increased at an even faster rate. Of the 15 public universities in Michigan, three reported a decrease in the number of degrees they give out compared to 2002-03, while the other 12 reported an increase with GVSU leading the way. “We are doing our part to ensure that the state of Michigan has the well- educated college graduates it needs for the knowledge economy of the 21st century and keeping them here,” Haas said. News......................................................A3 Opinion.........................................................A4 Laker Life............................................................A5 Special Section n Business College covers loss of Promise for top students in need By Anya Zentmeyer GVL Staff Writer Late this semester, many students felt the brunt of the blow when the Michigan Promise Scholarship and Michigan Competitive Scholarship were taken away. Fortunately, for a select few students, the Seidman College of Business’ Dean’s Advisory Board will recognize the top students of greatest need with hopes to alleviate some of that financial burden with the S e i d m a n C o l l e g e S p e c i a l S t u d e n t Scholarship, which will award $500 to the top 20 Seidman students. “ T h e r e “So we’re kind of just stepping up when things got tough ... “ MARK OLESNAVAGE DEAN’S ADVISORY BOARD CHAIRPERSON were- about 900 people in the sort of ‘universe’ that we looked at, and we looked at students that not only lost out on Michigan Competitive Scholarship, but the Michigan Promise Scholarship, too, since they got hit double,” said Mark Olesnavage, chairperson of the DAB. “I think there was 900 plus of those students in that category. Then they sorted based on financial need and performance and came up with a group of 20 students. The scholarship is $500 to each student.” Vonnie Herrera, director of external relations and ommunications at the Seidman School of Business, said the board is also looking to establish another scholarship that will allocate $4,000 to students each year. “A Scholarship Committee c omp r i s e d of m e m b e r s is board being ident i f ied,” H e r r e r a said. “Tha c ommi t t e e w i l d e t e r m i n e the criteria for these new awards and will likely recommend that ‘Leadership Scholarships’ be granted to Seidman business students beginning with the fall semester of 2010.” The money for the scholarship will not come from the school’s budget but rather from the pockets of those on the board. The dues, essentially donations, each Advisory Board member pays every year to support various activities for the board will fund the scholarships. “The idea came from a discussion we had in terms of how tough things were for students and how scholarships were scarce and being pulled away from the people who needed it,” Olesnavage said. “And James Williams and the Dean’s Advisory Board went over the situation and saw how tough it was on students and we all thought, ‘Hey, we should do something.’” Olesnavage said the board recognizes this does not make everything right for students, given the total expense of school, but does hope it will help students financially, as well as show students the board wants them to stay in school See Scholarships, A2 GVL / Mark Andrus Students celebrate as they walk across the stage to signify their graduation. INDEX A GVL / Mark Andrus GVSU President Thomas J. Haas congratulates students as he hands them their diplomas. About 900 students completed their degrees in the fall 2009 semester. The commencement ceremony took place at the Van Andel Arena on Saturday. Fall commencement boasts 900 grads By Nadira Kharmai GVL Staff Writer Words of encouragement are expected at any graduation ceremony. The themes of this semester’s commencement last Saturday not only included encouraging words but also a request for graduating students to continue their initiatives of success and education. “We must here at GVSU comes into play throughout life,” Hardy said. Hardy’s love and appreciation to the university is similar to the sentiments of many alumni. S h a r o n “Everything you experience at GVSU comes into play throughout life.” TROY A. HARDY RECIPIENT OF DISTINGUISHED ALUMNUS AWARD transform Michigan for the better with risk-taking and collaboration,” said this year’s commenceme Sue Coleman. Coleman, president of Michigan-Ann the economic “Michigan n and skills of to turn the sta President also encourag confident and making changes.” The ceremony its theme recognizing th music editor with the Dist Award. During commencement, his accomplis his achieveme State University. “Everything you experience LaChappelle who sat in the crowd to watch her son Levi receive his diploma also spoke about her appreciation for GVSU, which is her alma mater. In 1997, she earned her bachelor’s degree and in 2004, her master’s. “I enjoyed my experience at GVSU leads Michigan schools in number of degrees awarded Last semester’s commencement ceremony marked a milestone for Grand Valley State University, which continued on Saturday, as the university recorded the greatest increase in the number of graduates during the past 10 years compared to other Michigan schools. The Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System Completion Survey released the data on Nov. 30. For the 1998-99 school year, GVSU awarded 2,478 degrees, which increased to 4,754 in 2008-09, for a 91.8 percent growth. “Grand Valley’s GVL / Mark Andrus Mary Sue Coleman, president of U-M- Ann Arbor, spoke at commencement. accomplishment is all the more remarkable because the university’s graduation increases have come at a time when state aid has dropped dramatically and our tuition held to a rate below the state average,” said GVSU President Thomas J. Haas in a press release. While GVSU currently enrolls 24,408 students, with a student body growth rate of about 42 percent for the past 10 years, the number of graduates has increased at an even faster rate. Of the 15 public universities in Michigan, three reported a decrease in the number of degrees they give out compared to 2002-03, while the other 12 reported an increase with GVSU leading the way. “We are doing our part to ensure that the state of Michigan has the well- educated college graduates it needs for the knowledge economy of the 21st century and keeping them here,” Haas said. News......................................................A3 Opinion.........................................................A4 Laker Life............................................................A5 Special Section Monday, Monday, December 14, 2009 Student leaves university after alleged sexual harassment By Chelsea Lane GVL Assistant News Editor A student has left the university after attempting to offer money to other students to remove their shirts. The Grand Valley State University Department of Public Safety reported the now former student made this request to several students on the Allendale Campus. The offender is no longer a student and has been trespassed from all the campus properties. Criminal charges for disorderly conduct have been issued by the Ottawa County Prosecutors Office. The university’s anti- harassment policy qualifies sexual harassment as “unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors and other verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature ... (which) has the purpose or effect of unreasonably interfering with or crating an intimidating, See Harassment, A2 Allendale looks to add sidewalks along 48th By Dan Michniewicz GVL Copy Editor Whether it is for exercise or just to get to the next party, traveling by foot or bicycle on 48th Avenue can prove a precarious situation. Other than the lone stretch of concrete in front of Hillcrest Townhouses, there are no sidewalks. Phil Brummel, Allendale Township’s zoning administrator, said the township board has actively sought grants to fund the installation of sidewalks along 48th Avenue. “The state and federal government had some money available for sidewalk construction for properties that were in close proximity to school districts,” Brummel said. “But the money wasn’t available for ... colleges or universities, only for elementary schools.” Brummel also noted 48th Avenue does not have an in- ground storm water detention system, so ditches are needed to manage rainwater. “When you have that kind of topographic elevation, it’s difficult to put sidewalks in those spaces,” Brummel said. However, Ottawa County and Allendale Township plan to expand the section of 48th Avenue from Lake Michigan Drive to Pierce Street in 2015. If 48th Avenue is expanded, part of the expansion would likely include an in-ground runoff system, creating an opportunity for the construction of sidewalks. Allendale Township would have to provide the funds for these See Sidewalks, A2 GVL Archive Some want sidewalks in the greater campus area to increase safety. Sports...........................................................A6 A&E.........................................................A8 Marketplace................................................A9 Championship Edition

Business College Covers Loss Of Promise For Top Students In Need

Anya Zentmeyer

Late this semester, many students felt the brunt of the blow when the Michigan Promise Scholarship and Michigan Competitive Scholarship were taken away.<br /> <br /> Fortunately, for a select few students, the Seidman College of Business’ Dean’s Advisory Board will recognize the top students of greatest need with hopes to alleviate some of that financial burden with the S e i d m a n C o l l e g e S p e c i a l S t u d e n t Scholarship, which will award $500 to the top 20 Seidman students.<br /> <br /> “ T h e r e were- about 900 people in the sort of ‘universe’ that we looked at, and we looked at students that not only lost out on Michigan Competitive Scholarship, but the Michigan Promise Scholarship, too, since they got hit double,” said Mark Olesnavage, chairperson of the DAB. “I think there was 900 plus of those students in that category. Then they sorted based on financial need and performance and came up with a group of 20 students. The scholarship is $500 to each student.” Vonnie Herrera, director of external relations and ommunications at the Seidman School of Business, said the board is also looking to establish another scholarship that will allocate $4,000 to students each year.<br /> <br /> “A Scholarship Committee c o m p r i s e d of board m e m b e r s is being identified,” H e r r e r a said. “That c o m m i t t e e w i l l d e t e r m i n e the criteria for these new awards and will likely recommend that ‘Leadership Scholarships’ be granted to Seidman business students beginning with the fall semester of 2010.” The money for the scholarship will not come from the school’s budget but rather from the pockets of those on the board. The dues, essentially donations, each Advisory Board member pays every year to support various activities for the board will fund the scholarships.<br /> <br /> “The idea came from a discussion we had in terms of how tough things were for students and how scholarships were scarce and being pulled away from the people who needed it,” Olesnavage said.<br /> <br /> “And James Williams and the Dean’s Advisory Board went over the situation and saw how tough it was on students and we all thought, ‘Hey, we should do something.’” Olesnavage said the board recognizes this does not make everything right for students, given the total expense of school, but does hope it will help students financially, as well as show students the board wants them to stay in school And succeed.<br /> <br /> “I hopefully think it’s that students in the Seidman program know that there are people who do want to see them succeed and continue on, and we’re being as supportive as we can,” Olesnavage said. “So we’re kind of just stepping up when things got tough, and especially when you plan on things and all of the sudden it’s pulled out from underneath you. So we’re just sort of saying, ‘We feel your pain a little bit, and we’re trying to help.’” azentmeyer@lanthorn.com

Fall Commencement Boasts 900 Grads

Nadira Kharmai

Words of encouragement are expected at any graduation ceremony. The themes of this semester’s c o m m e n c e m e n t last Saturday not only included encouraging words but also a request for graduating students to continue their initiatives of success and education.<br /> <br /> “We must transform Michigan for the better with risk-taking and collaboration,” said this year’s commencement speaker, Mary Sue Coleman.<br /> <br /> Coleman, who serves as president of the University of Michigan-Ann Arbor spoke of the economic crisis and how “Michigan needs the creativity and skills of exemplary students to turn the state around.” President Thomas J. Haas also encouraged students to be confident and “have no fear in making changes.” The ceremony continued its theme of motivation by recognizing the Emmy-nominated music editor Troy A. Hardy with the Distinguished Alumnus Award. During the video played at commencement, Hardy spoke of his accomplishments and credited his achievements to Grand Valley State University.<br /> <br /> “Everything you experience here at GVSU comes into play throughout life,” Hardy said.<br /> <br /> Hardy’s love and appreciation to the university is similar to the sentiments of many alumni.<br /> <br /> S h a r o n LaChappelle who sat in the crowd to watch her son Levi receive his diploma also spoke about her appreciation for GVSU, which is her alma mater.<br /> <br /> In 1997, she earned her bachelor’s degree and in 2004, her master’s.<br /> <br /> “I enjoyed my experience at GVSU,” LaChappelle said. “Everything from the social work program to the professors was really amazing.” Sharon’s mother is also a GVSU alumnus, which makes Levi a thirdgeneration graduate.<br /> <br /> Sharon said it was a wonderful discovery when her family recently made the connection about three generations having gone through school at GVSU.<br /> <br /> “I never thought about how three of us completed an accomplishment like this,” she said. “We didn’t set out to do this; it just happened.” Levi said he did not choose GVSU because of his mother or grandmother but chose it for the sociology program and other activities the school has to offer. He said up until a few days before commencement, he never processed the thought of what it meant to carry on an educational tradition.<br /> <br /> “It is a novelty to say I am a third-generation alumnus,” Levi said. “GVSU has grown a lot and not many people can say their parents and grandparents went here.” The social work student completed his studies in the typical four years.<br /> <br /> More than 900 students participated in the fall 2009 graduation ceremony.<br /> <br /> Graduates of the colleges of Community and Public Service, Engineering and Computing, Health Professions, Education, Interdisciplinary Studies, Liberal Arts and Sciences, Nursing and Business walked in Saturday’s ceremony.<br /> <br /> Nkharmai@lanthorn.com

GVSU Leads Michigan Schools In Number Of Degrees Awarded

Last semester’s commencement ceremony marked a milestone for Grand Valley State University, which continued on Saturday, as the university recorded the greatest increase in the number of graduates during the past 10 years compared to other Michigan schools.<br /> <br /> The Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System Completion Survey released the data on Nov. 30.<br /> <br /> For the 1998-99 school year, GVSU awarded 2,478 degrees, which increased to 4,754 in 2008-09, for a 91.8 percent growth.<br /> <br /> “Grand Valley’s accomplishment is all the more remarkable because the university’s graduation increases have come at a time when state aid has dropped dramatically and our tuition held to a rate below the state average,” said GVSU President Thomas J. Haas in a press release.<br /> <br /> While GVSU currently enrolls 24,408 students, with a student body growth rate of about 42 percent for the past 10 years, the number of graduates has increased at an even faster rate.<br /> <br /> Of the 15 public universities in Michigan, three reported a decrease in the number of degrees they give out compared to 2002-03, while the other 12 reported an increase with GVSU leading the way.<br /> <br /> “We are doing our part to ensure that the state of Michigan has the welleducated college graduates it needs for the knowledge economy of the 21st century and keeping them here,” Haas said.

Student Leaves University After Alleged Sexual Harassment

Chelsea Lane

A student has left the university after attempting to offer money to other students to remove their shirts.<br /> <br /> The Grand Valley State University Department of Public Safety reported the now former student made this request to several students on the Allendale Campus. The offender is no longer a student and has been trespassed from all the campus properties.<br /> <br /> Criminal charges for disorderly conduct have been issued by the Ottawa County Prosecutors Office.<br /> <br /> The university’s antiharassment policy qualifies sexual harassment as “unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors and other verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature ... (which) has the purpose or effect of unreasonably interfering with or crating an intimidating, Hostile, or offensive working or education environment.” According to the GVSU Student Handbook, a student who is found responsible for physical or verbal harassment or intimidation of any kind may be removed from on-campus housing.<br /> <br /> Victims are advised to report any instances of harassment or intimidation to a Housing or Residence Life staff member or, if they think they are in immediate or severe danger, to the police.<br /> <br /> Assistantnews@lanthorn.com

Allendale Looks To Add Sidewalks Along 48th

Dan Michniewicz

Whether it is for exercise or just to get to the next party, traveling by foot or bicycle on 48th Avenue can prove a precarious situation. Other than the lone stretch of concrete in front of Hillcrest Townhouses, there are no sidewalks.<br /> <br /> Phil Brummel, Allendale Township’s zoning administrator, said the township board has actively sought grants to fund the installation of sidewalks along 48th Avenue.<br /> <br /> “The state and federal government had some money available for sidewalk construction for properties that were in close proximity to school districts,” Brummel said. “But the money wasn’t available for ... colleges or universities, only for elementary schools.” Brummel also noted 48th Avenue does not have an inground storm water detention system, so ditches are needed to manage rainwater.<br /> <br /> “When you have that kind of topographic elevation, it’s difficult to put sidewalks in those spaces,” Brummel said.<br /> <br /> However, Ottawa County and Allendale Township plan to expand the section of 48th Avenue from Lake Michigan Drive to Pierce Street in 2015.<br /> <br /> If 48th Avenue is expanded, part of the expansion would likely include an in-ground runoff system, creating an opportunity for the construction of sidewalks.<br /> <br /> Allendale Township would have to provide the funds for these Sidewalks.<br /> <br /> Township Supervisor Jerry Alkema said the township plans to fund them with federal money through the Grand Valley Metro Council.<br /> <br /> “The funding looks pretty secure,” Alkema said.<br /> <br /> The township has not yet determined whether 48th will be expanded into a five-lane road or a boulevard.<br /> <br /> “If we’re leaning somewhere, it would be a boulevard,” Alkema said.<br /> <br /> Brummel said the expansion of the road as well as the addition of sidewalks would benefit both pedestrians and drivers.<br /> <br /> “Any time you separate pedestrians from traffic and separate traffic going in both directions with a green median, it will make for a safer environment,” he said.<br /> <br /> “Whether it’s a person trying to cross the road going to campus in Allendale or someone in a vehicle going to the downtown campus, the boulevard is much safer in the long haul.” From the 1998 to 2008, the average number of vehicles driven per day on 48th Avenue increased by 700.<br /> <br /> As almost 10,000 vehicles a day travel 48th Avenue just south of Lake Michigan Drive, an increase of 700 is not too significant, especially when increases in Grand Valley State University’s enrollment and the number of housing complexes on the avenue during those same 10 years are taken into account. Nonetheless, both enrollment and the number offcampus housing complexes continue to increase.<br /> <br /> “48th is going to be a busier and busier street,” Alkema said.<br /> <br /> Alkema also said the township tries to add a new stretch of sidewalk each year. Last year, the township added sidewalks to a section of 68th Street. Next year, it has plans to add sidewalks to 60th Avenue south of Lake Michigan Drive.<br /> <br /> What about the role played by off-campus housing complexes? The owners of Hillcrest Townhouses have built sidewalks on their property, though other complexes have not followed suit.<br /> <br /> With the potential expansion of 48th Avenue looming, Brummel said it would be unreasonable to mandate offcampus housing complexes to construct sidewalks.<br /> <br /> “It may be wiser to wait for when the road is improved so that (any new sidewalks) aren’t torn up in just a few minutes,” he said.<br /> <br /> Because the township is waiting until the expansion to add any sidewalks along 48th Avenue, current GVSU students looking for a safe road to jog or walk along are out of luck. That is, of course, unless they plan on graduating with one or two “supers” preceding their senior status and are still around for 2015.<br /> <br /> “The difficulty we got into was obviously the timing of it,” Alkema said. “2015 isn’t too far away, so we are better off waiting for it.” dmichniewicz@lanthorn.com

Next Page


Publication List
 

Loading