Montessori Sun Times Summer 2010 : Page 1

A newsletter for The Children’s House community in Traverse City · Summer 2010 www.traversechildrenshouse.org ‘Good at Doing Things’ talk Oct. 7 Montessori education optimal for developing higher cognitive functions By Michele Shane Did you ever wonder what’s going on in there? Picture a child walking through the door of her Montessori classroom. She is greeted by the guide and, perhaps, several of her classmates. She may sit down to begin her work in process that she started the day before. Or, she may start her day by preparing herself a snack and sitting with a peer to have a conversation. As she takes in the environ-ment through all of her senses via interactions with the teacher, other students and the hands-on materials as she goes about her day, what is happening in her brain? Sure, being able to make good choices, move around freely throughout the day and work with others sounds like a good thing, but what is the “proof?” How can we be sure that a Montes-sori approach to education is optimal in fostering the development of higher cognitive functions, social cognition and such higher-order competencies as empathy and leadership? Dr. Steve Hughes, PhD, LP, ABPdN and assistant professor of Pediatrics and Neurology at the University of Minnesota Medical School will be here to answer those questions and more. On Thursday, October 7th at 7:00 pm, Dr. Hughes will be here presenting his lecture titled “Good at Doing Things-Mon-tessori Education and Higher-Order Cognitive Functions. If you ever wished you knew more about what goes on inside the mind of your child, this lecture is one you won’t want to miss! Volunteering enriches many lives Hop to It! By Missy Russell The Corporation for National and Community Service recently reported that across our country, 63.4 million Americans volunteered to help their communities in 2009 which was up by 1.6 million volunteers in 2008. These efforts equated to 8.1 billion hours of service, which has an estimated dollar value of nearly $169 billion! Support and service to an organization you believe in is an important part of life. It is a core lesson that the Children’s House teaches beginning with toddlers who transport snacks from the kitchen down to their classmates, to elementary students who gather and sort recycling for the entire school. Children here are educated in an environment that values helpfulness. They are given daily opportunities to aid their peers and contribute to their greater community as well. Primary and Elementary students do service work outside of their classrooms throughout the year and these experiences shape them. They leave them prepared, willing, and able to contribute to society through a lifetime of leadership and service. Volunteerism is necessary to Parent volunteer Tania listens to an emerging reader. the success of any non-profit and an invaluable model to mirror for your children. We thank all of the parents at The Children’s House who have engaged in this lesson and invite everyone else to find the time! Through your gifts of time, talent, and resources you show meaningful support of this school. Volunteering is a wonderful way to meet new families, spend time with old friends and observe some of the special moments that happen with the children behind these walls. We encourage you to get involved! Dr. Steve Hughes speaks at TCH October 7, 2010. Field Day is an opportunity for the entire student community to join together for exercise, laughs and camaraderie.

‘Good at Doing Things’ Talk Oct. 7

Michele Shane

Montessori education optimal for developing higher cognitive functions<br /> <br /> Did you ever wonder what’s going on in there?<br /> <br /> Picture a child walking through the door of her Montessori classroom. She is greeted by the guide and, perhaps, several of her classmates. She may sit down to begin her work in process that she started the day before. Or, she may start her day by preparing herself a snack and sitting with a peer to have a conversation.<br /> <br /> As she takes in the environment through all of her senses via interactions with the teacher, other students and the hands-on materials as she goes about her day, what is happening in her brain? Sure, being able to make good choices, move around freely throughout the day and work with others sounds like a good thing, but what is the “proof?” How can we be sure that a Montessori approach to education is optimal in fostering the development of higher cognitive functions, social cognition and such higher-order competencies as empathy and leadership?<br /> <br /> Dr. Steve Hughes, PhD, LP, ABPdN and assistant professor of Pediatrics and Neurology at the University of Minnesota Medical School will be here to answer those questions and more. On Thursday, October 7th at 7:00 pm, Dr. Hughes will be here presenting his lecture titled “Good at Doing Things- Montessori Education and Higher-Order Cognitive Functions.<br /> <br /> If you ever wished you knew more about what goes on inside the mind of your child, this lecture is one you won’t want to miss!<br />

Volunteering Enriches Many Lives

Missy Russell

The Corporation for National and Community Service recently reported that across our country, 63.4 million Americans volunteered to help their communities in 2009 which was up by 1.6 million volunteers in<br /> <br /> 2008. These efforts equated to 8.1 billion hours of service, which has an estimated dollar value of nearly $169 billion!<br /> <br /> Support and service to an organization you believe in is an important part of life. It is a core lesson that the Children’s House teaches beginning with toddlers who transport snacks from the Kitchen down to their classmates, to elementary students who gather and sort recycling for the entire school.<br /> <br /> Children here are educated in an environment that values helpfulness.<br /> <br /> They are given daily opportunities to aid their peers and contribute to their greater community as well.<br /> <br /> Primary and Elementary students do service work outside of their classrooms throughout the year and these experiences shape them. They leave them prepared, willing, and able to contribute to society through a lifetime of leadership and service.<br /> <br /> Volunteerism is necessary to the success of any non-profit and an invaluable model to mirror for your children.<br /> <br /> We thank all of the parents at The Children’s House who have engaged in this lesson and invite everyone else to find the time! Through your gifts of time, talent, and resources you show meaningful support of this school. Volunteering is a wonderful way to meet new families, spend time with old friends and observe some of the special moments that happen with the children behind these walls. We encourage you to get Involved!

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