Sparta Today April 2010 : Page 1

April / May2010 Vol. 3, Issue 2 ESTABLISHED IN SUMMER 2008 Support, preserve Sparta community – shop locally SPARTA’S COMMUNITY EVENTS Sparta Cub Scouts Pig Roast April 16th @ Moose Lodge 6-8 p.m. Grease Musical by SHS April 22-24 @ 7:30 p.m. April 25 @ 3 p.m. April 29-30 @ 7:30 p.m. HS Auditorium Sparta Band Fish Dinner Fundraiser April 23 @ Moose Lodge 6 – 8 p.m. Family FUN Festival April 24 11 a.m–5 p.m. Appleview Spring Clean Up April 22-24 Sparta Village DPW Sparta Rotary Creek Clean Up April 26 3-6 p.m. Faith’s Angels & Sparta Little League Pancake Breakfast May 1 @ Civic Center 7:30 a.m. - 10:30 a.m. Sparta Little League Parade May 1 in Downtown Sparta 8 a.m. Hanging Basket Sale Benefits Relay for Life May 7-8 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Knowlton & McFall Dentistry Pink Dress Run Bar Hop Fundraiser May 29 Downtown Sparta Noon-6 p.m. Spartachamber.com Sparta Memorial Day Service Lamoreaux Park 10 a.m. Relay for Life June 11-June 12 Noon-to-noon Sparta Football Field This article will be the first in a series discussing the importance of thinking local first in order to maximize the impact of our daily actions and purchasing decisions. BY ELIZABETHGORSKI-MORSE SPARTA DDA/CHAMBER OF COMMERCE DIRECTOR We’ve all done it before. You are in need of some- thing, so you jump in the car and head down to Alpine or Grand Rapids without realiz- ing the impact you are mak- ing on our community. Instead of considering a locally owned business in Sparta, we are brainwashed into thinking we will save a few nickels or dollars at a big box store in another com- munity. So, the question becomes, why should we, in Sparta, support the independent business owners? The answer is that spend- ing money with locally owned businesses is proven to put our money to work directly helping our commu- nity’s local economy through supporting schools, local youth sports teams and com- munity events. Locally owned businesses also provide great customer service, knowledgeable em- ployees and unique products in addition to supporting the local fundraisers. It seems that every time an athlete, club member, or service group is looking to raise funds in Sparta, they visit the local businesses for FROM SPARTA EDUCATION FOUNDATON BOARD The Sparta Education Foundation board is proud to report that more than $17,000 in grants were awarded this school year. Some items funded by grants this year include document cameras for computers at Ridgeview and Appleview (Elmo pro- Courtesy photo Elite Landscape doing their part to support Sparta School System and community youth organizations. Pictured left to right: Eric Hankis, Chris Nadeau, Kathy Nadeau, and Katie Vanoeffelen. sponsorship and donations. Without those local busi- nesses, youth programs would be practically non- existent or entirely funded by parents and chocolate bars. Locally owned businesses also work together for the success of the community as they are a vested part of the community. One local business, Elite Landscape Maintenance, knows about the benefits and responsibilities as an inde- jectors), Early Childhood Program DVDs for parent use, video camera and microphones for produc- ing the Spartan News at the high school and story books that promote school values to middle school students. The Sparta Education Foundation offers several ways for individuals, fami- lies and businesses to show pendent business owner. “After hearing about the funding cutbacks from our local schools, Elite Land- scape Maintenance offered to fertilize and weed control the competition fields and weed control the entire district school grounds,” said com- pany owner Chris Nadeau. Nadeau said as a landscap- ing company, this is a way that his business can also fur- ther enhance the aesthetics of Sparta. $17K grants awarded for education their support for Sparta students. In addition to attending annual fundraisers, like RetroBowl in the spring and Food for Thought at Downtown Trini’s in the fall, donations can be made in memory of or in honor of a special friend or fami- ly member. Engraved pavers make up the Spartan Pride Pathway in front of Sparta High School. Cost ranges from $50 or $150 with pro- ceeds going into the Foundation’s endowment fund and directly benefit- ting our students. Spartan Pride Pathway order forms are available at the high school. “Most of my employee’s children go to School in Sparta and we wanted to do something to help the com- munity and enhance our school system,” he said. “It’s important as a community to help each other out and support each other. That’s why I choose to live here.” Business owners’ ability to give back to their communi- ty, like Elite Landscape, is clearly showing. Nadeau agrees that other larger out-of-town compa- nies often slide into town, may even charge a few dol- lars less for their services, but then, they’re never heard from again. Saving a few dollars to hire an out- of-town business is really costing our community in the end. Nadeau also supports two youth athletic teams in Sparta. The Sparta Little League Girls Major Softball SEE SHOP LOCAL,PAGE 10 : In This Issue : Page 2 Sparta Business Beat Page 3 Pink Dress Run...Walk...Crawl Page 3 Town&Country artwork winner Pages 7 & 8 Sparta Spotlight: School News Pages 10 & 12 Milestones: Ladies Literacy Club POSTAGE PAID Permit # 338 Greenville, MI 48838 PRSRT STD MAIL U.S.

Support, Ppreserve Sparta Community – Shop Locally

ELIZABETH GORSKI-MORSE

We’ve all done it before.<br /> <br /> You are in need of something, so you jump in the car and head down to Alpine or Grand Rapids without realizing the impact you are making on our community.<br /> <br /> Instead of considering a locally owned business in Sparta, we are brainwashed into thinking we will save a few nickels or dollars at a big box store in another community.<br /> <br /> So, the question becomes, why should we, in Sparta, support the independent business owners?<br /> <br /> The answer is that spending money with locally owned businesses is proven to put our money to work directly helping our community’s local economy through supporting schools, local youth sports teams and community events.<br /> <br /> Locally owned businesses also provide great customer service, knowledgeable employees and unique products in addition to supporting the local fundraisers.<br /> <br /> It seems that every time an athlete, club member, or service group is looking to raise funds in Sparta, they visit the local businesses for sponsorship and donations.<br /> <br /> Without those local businesses, youth programs would be practically nonexistent or entirely funded by parents and chocolate bars.<br /> <br /> Locally owned businesses also work together for the success of the community as they are a vested part of the community.<br /> <br /> One local business, Elite Landscape Maintenance, knows about the benefits and responsibilities as an independent business owner.<br /> <br /> “After hearing about the funding cutbacks from our local schools, Elite Landscape Maintenance offered to fertilize and weed control the competition fields and weed control the entire district school grounds,” said company owner Chris Nadeau.<br /> <br /> Nadeau said as a landscaping company, this is a way that his business can also further enhance the aesthetics of Sparta.<br /> <br /> “Most of my employee’s children go to School in Sparta and we wanted to do something to help the community and enhance our school system,” he said. “It’s important as a community to help each other out and support each other. That’s why I choose to live here.” Business owners’ ability to give back to their community, like Elite Landscape, is clearly showing.<br /> <br /> Nadeau agrees that other larger out-of-town companies often slide into town, may even charge a few dollars less for their services, but then, they’re never heard from again. Saving a few dollars to hire an outof- town business is really costing our community in the end.<br /> <br /> Nadeau also supports two youth athletic teams in Sparta. The Sparta Little League Girls Major Softball<br /> <br /> Team 1 and the Sparta Youth Soccer Team for sixyear- olds are sponsored by Elite Landscape and sister company Majestic Landscapes.<br /> <br /> “Majestic and Elite are sponsoring two teams this year, as one of my employee relatives play on those teams. It’s important,” Nadeau adds with a grin, “to give back to the community that supports you.” Sparta Chamber events and other community events and projects are made possible through local businesses, both with dollars and volunteer hours.<br /> <br /> Through donations for sponsorships Sparta Town & Country Days, Concerts in the Park, Harvest on the Ridge and Old Fashioned Christmas events are made possible.<br /> <br /> Without the support of the local businesses, the Chamber would be unable to afford to host events and special activities for children and families of Sparta.<br /> <br /> Understandably, certain supplies and necessities are not always available at a local business in Sparta.<br /> <br /> Yet, to utilize the business services and products that are available in Sparta will keep the dollars you spend revolving in the community longer through employee paychecks, support for youth sports and community events.<br /> <br /> More dollars for businesses means more local jobs, which revolves more money back into the community.<br /> <br /> Re-think shopping Sparta the next time you are about to head into Grand Rapids. If it is available here, do your part and consider how much impact your dollar will make in our local economy.<br /> <br /> If you know of another local-owned business that is giving back to the community or supporting other local businesses through creative partnerships, write in to us at the Sparta Chamber, Box 142, Sparta 49345.<br /> <br /> The Sparta Chamber of Commerce mission is to “Promote Local Business through Community Interaction.”

$17K Grants Awarded For Education

The Sparta Education Foundation board is proud to report that more than $17,000 in grants were awarded this school year.<br /> <br /> Some items funded by grants this year include document cameras for computers at Ridgeview and Appleview (Elmo projectors), Early Childhood Program DVDs for parent use, video camera and microphones for producing the Spartan News at the high school and story books that promote school values to middle school students.<br /> <br /> The Sparta Education Foundation offers several ways for individuals, families and businesses to show their support for Sparta students.<br /> <br /> In addition to attending annual fundraisers, like RetroBowl in the spring and Food for Thought at Downtown Trini’s in the fall, donations can be made in memory of or in honor of a special friend or family member.<br /> <br /> Engraved pavers make up the Spartan Pride Pathway in front of Sparta High School. Cost ranges from $50 or $150 with proceeds going into the Foundation’s endowment fund and directly benefitting our students.<br /> <br /> Spartan Pride Pathway order forms are available at the high school

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