Observer september 5 2014 : Page 1

Douglas City Council Separates Kid Curfew & Disorderly Intoxication In Proposed Ordinance Page 3 History Of Felt Mansion & Estate Topic Of S-D Historical Society Program September 10th Page 3 Presorted Standard U.S. Postage Paid Saugatuck MI Permit No. 30 CURRENT RESIDENT THE LOCAL OBSERVER WE BRING YOU THE NEWS SERVING September 5, 2014 Vol. 12 No. 35 FREE SAUGATUCK * DOUGLAS * SAUGATUCK TOWNSHIP * LAKETOWN TOWNSHIP * FENNVILLE * GLENN * GANGES TOWNSHIP * HAMILTON * HOLLAND * SOUTH HAVEN Douglas Resident & Comedy Club Owner Mark Ridley Survives Heart Attack Neal Rubin The Detroit News Mark Ridley of Douglas is a smart individual, but even smart men tend to be stupid when it comes to trivial details like their health and well-being. I can say that because I’ve been a guy all my life, and I know that if I cut my finger off with a circle saw, my first inclination would be to Mark Ridley put ice on the stump and go watch football. Fingers grow back, don’t they? As for Ridley, he did a lot of things right when his chest started to hurt last month. Then he did some-thing classically guy-like. Fortunately, he’s married to a woman, and she has enough com-mon sense that she was able to spare some of the overflow. So he’s around today to make fun of himself, as opposed to having one of the most mirthful funerals anyone ever attend-ed. Ridley, 63, owns Mark Ridley’s Comedy Castle in Royal Oak. Metro Detroit’s foremost come-dy club has thrived in one location or another since 1979, and he’s on first-name terms with pretty much every stand-up comic who ever filmed an HBO special. Micro-managing from near and far, he’s been splitting time the last few years between a condo in Royal Oak and a house in Douglas, the gateway to Saugatuck. On Aug. 15, a Friday, he spent a fun-filled day hauling sewage-drenched possessions out of the flooded basement of the condo. The next day, he was taking his standard stroll along the Lake Michigan shoreline when his chest started to hurt. Then it started to hurt a lot — if not the classic elephant-on-the-chest, at least a hippo or a wildebeest. Ridley started going down the list of frequent heart attack symp-toms. Sore jaw? Check. Left arm numb? Yup. Back pain? You betcha. Naturally, he wasn’t carry-ing his phone, so he reversed direc-tion toward the house, walking that fine line between hurrying (a good idea) and running (not so good). He stumbled through the door, headed upstairs for an aspirin and encountered his wife, the lovely and sensible Sara Cullen. “You don’t look good,” she said. To which he responded, in classic male fashion: “I just need to lie down. It’ll go away.” Stents and common sense Fortunately, foolishness is not contagious. Cullen dialed 911. Whisked to Holland Hospital, Ridley was quickly diag-nosed with the heart attack he didn’t want to admit he was having. Three stents were inserted into one artery, and common sense was driven into the rest of him. Exercise? Check. Better diet? Yup. Rehab at West Michigan Heart Center in Holland? You betcha. In fairness, his diet was already better than lots of people’s — plenty of fish, minimal red meat — and he took brisk walks. With 95 percent blockage in the worst artery, though, and trou-ble looming in two others, the filet he had for dinner the night before the coronary was “the last steak I’ll ever have,” laughed the irrepresible local comedian. Local O Competitor Misleads Fennville Officials Staff Report The husband of the publisher of a City of Allegan-based local publication that only goes to 420 subscribers in all of Allegan County misled Fennville City Commission officials recently when he tried to tell city leaders they couldn’t advertise their legal notices in The Local Observer because it’s “an illegal newspaper.” Walt Kaechele, husband of Allegan-based publisher Cheryl Kaechele, made the demonstrably false public statement at a public meeting after The Local Observer offered to save the City of Fennville thousands of dollars in annual adver-tising costs currently being paid to another Kaechele newspaper in the City of Allegan. The Local Observer has been credited with saving the taxpayers of Saugatuck, Douglas and Saugatuck Public Schools thousands of dollars a year in advertising costs by offering $1,000-a-year capped contracts for all the city’s and school district’s respective legal and other advertising as part of an ongoing campaign to free up more money for public projects and services. “The Kaechele’s false state-ments are nothing new,” said Observer Editor Mike Gallagher. “They have repeatedly made false accusations against The Local Observer staff and others -and allow others to do so in unsigned paid advertisements and letters to the edi-tor -simply because they apparently can’t compete with us on any level. It’s pathetic.” Judge Rules Saugatuck’s Sign Ordinance Is Unconstitutional In Lake St. Case Staff Report An Allegan County judge has ruled that the City of Saugatuck’s local sign ordinance is unconstitutional, according to City Manager Kirk Harrier. In a ruling late Wednesday, Allegan County District Court Judge Joseph S. Skocelas addressed the con-troversial case pitting two men who own a home at 790 Lake Street and city officials over the homeowner’s placement of multiple signs in front of their house. Life partners John Porzondek -a former Saugatuck city councilman who is once again run-ning for a seat on the municipal board -and James Serman weeks ago received notification from city offi-cials that they were in violation of a local ordinance limiting the number of signs a homeowner can display on their property. The pair currently have more than a dozen signs in their front yard in response to their failed attempts to persuade the city to allow them to have an awning installed over an upstairs area of their home. The two men had lost sev-eral court battles over the issue. The signs -many of which refer to the awning issue -are art, argue Porzondek and Serman. But Skocelas reportedly did not rule on whether or not the signs are art and thus protected constitu-tionally, according to Harrier. The judge simply ruled that the city’s sign ordinance is unconstitutional. Harrier said the city was responding to neighbors complaints about the numerous signs on the men’s property when it issued the ordinance violation. The men reportedly said their display, called Misfit Art Butterfly “was created out of our soul’s necessity to balance our under-standing of forces directly attacking our artistic goals in the restoration, adornment and protection of our home within this place called Saugatuck,” Porzondek and James Bryan Serman wrote on their website, lakestreetcommons.com. The pair run a lodging business at their home. Harrier said the city council will have to discuss the judge’s ruling before a decision is made whether or not to appeal Skocelas’ ruling.

Douglas Resident & Comedy Club Owner Mark Ridley Survives Heart Attack

Neal Rubin

Mark Ridley of Douglas is a smart individual, but even smart men tend to be stupid when it comes to trivial details like their health and well-being.<br /> <br /> I can say that because I’ve been a guy all my life, and I know that if I cut my finger off with a circle saw, my first inclination would be to put ice on the stump and go watch football. Fingers grow back, don’t they?<br /> <br /> As for Ridley, he did a lot of things right when his chest started to hurt last month. Then he did something classically guy-like.<br /> <br /> Fortunately, he’s married to a woman, and she has enough common sense that she was able to spare some of the overflow. So he’s around today to make fun of himself, as opposed to having one of the most mirthful funerals anyone ever attended.<br /> <br /> Ridley, 63, owns Mark Ridley’s Comedy Castle in Royal Oak. Metro Detroit’s foremost comedy club has thrived in one location or another since 1979, and he’s on first name terms with pretty much every stand-up comic who ever filmed an HBO special.<br /> <br /> Micro-managing from near and far, he’s been splitting time the last few years between a condo in Royal Oak and a house in Douglas, the gateway to Saugatuck.<br /> <br /> On Aug. 15, a Friday, he spent a fun-filled day hauling sewagedrenched possessions out of the flooded basement of the condo.<br /> <br /> The next day, he was taking his standard stroll along the Lake Michigan shoreline when his chest started to hurt.<br /> <br /> Then it started to hurt a lot — if not the classic elephant-on-the-chest, at least a hippo or a wildebeest.<br /> <br /> Ridley started going down the list of frequent heart attack symptoms.<br /> <br /> Sore jaw? Check. Left arm numb? Yup. Back pain? You betcha.<br /> <br /> Naturally, he wasn’t carrying his phone, so he reversed direction toward the house, walking that fine line between hurrying (a good idea) and running (not so good).<br /> <br /> He stumbled through the door, headed upstairs for an aspirin and encountered his wife, the lovely and sensible Sara Cullen.<br /> <br /> “You don’t look good,” she said.<br /> <br /> To which he responded, in classic male fashion: <br /> <br /> “I just need to lie down. It’ll go away.” <br /> <br /> Stents and common sense<br /> <br /> Fortunately, foolishness is not contagious. Cullen dialed 911.<br /> <br /> Whisked to Holland Hospital, Ridley was quickly diagnosed with the heart attack he didn’t want to admit he was having.<br /> <br /> Three stents were inserted into one artery, and common sense was driven into the rest of him.<br /> <br /> Exercise? Check. Better diet? Yup. Rehab at West Michigan Heart Center in Holland? You betcha.<br /> <br /> In fairness, his diet was already better than lots of people’s — plenty of fish, minimal red meat — and he took brisk walks.<br /> <br /> With 95 percent blockage in the worst artery, though, and trouble looming in two others, the filet he had for dinner the night before the coronary was “the last steak I’ll ever have,” laughed the irrepresible local comedian.

Local O Competitor Misleads Fennville Officials

The husband of the publisher of a City of Allegan-based local publication that only goes to 420 subscribers in all of Allegan County misled Fennville City Commission officials recently when he tried to tell city leaders they couldn’t advertise their legal notices in The Local Observer because it’s “an illegal newspaper.”<br /> <br /> Walt Kaechele, husband of Allegan-based publisher Cheryl Kaechele, made the demonstrably false public statement at a public meeting after The Local Observer offered to save the City of Fennville thousands of dollars in annual advertising costs currently being paid to another Kaechele newspaper in the City of Allegan.<br /> <br /> The Local Observer has been credited with saving the taxpayers of Saugatuck, Douglas and Saugatuck Public Schools thousands of dollars a year in advertising costs by offering $1,000-a-year capped contracts for all the city’s and school district’s respective legal and other advertising as part of an ongoing campaign to free up more money for public projects and services.<br /> <br /> “The Kaechele’s false statements are nothing new,” said Observer Editor Mike Gallagher. “They have repeatedly made false accusations against The Local Observer staff and others - and allow others to do so in unsigned paid advertisements and letters to the editor - simply because they apparently can’t compete with us on any level. It’s pathetic.”

Judge Rules Saugatuck’s Sign Ordinance Is Unconstitutional In Lake St. Case

An Allegan County judge has ruled that the City of Saugatuck’s local sign ordinance is unconstitutional, according to City Manager Kirk Harrier.<br /> <br /> In a ruling late Wednesday, Allegan County District Court Judge Joseph S. Skocelas addressed the controversial case pitting two men who own a home at 790 Lake Street and city officials over the homeowner’s placement of multiple signs in front of their house.<br /> <br /> Life partners John Porzondek - a former Saugatuck city councilman who is once again running for a seat on the municipal board - and James Serman weeks ago received notification from city officials that they were in violation of a local ordinance limiting the number of signs a homeowner can display on their property.<br /> <br /> The pair currently have more than a dozen signs in their front yard in response to their failed attempts to persuade the city to allow them to have an awning installed over an upstairs area of their home.<br /> <br /> The two men had lost several court battles over the issue.<br /> <br /> The signs - many of which refer to the awning issue - are art, argue Porzondek and Serman.<br /> <br /> But Skocelas reportedly did not rule on whether or not the signs are art and thus protected constitutionally, according to Harrier. The judge simply ruled that the city’s sign ordinance is unconstitutional.<br /> <br /> Harrier said the city was responding to neighbors complaints about the numerous signs on the men’s property when it issued the ordinance violation.<br /> <br /> The men reportedly said their display, called Misfit Art Butterfly “was created out of our soul’s necessity to balance our understanding of forces directly attacking our artistic goals in the restoration, adornment and protection of our home within this place called Saugatuck,” Porzondek and James Bryan Serman wrote on their website, lakestreetcommons.com. <br /> <br /> The pair run a lodging business at their home.<br /> <br /> Harrier said the city council will have to discuss the judge’s ruling before a decision is made whether or not to appeal Skocelas’ ruling.

Mill Pond Realty

 

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