Observer September 3, 2009 : Page 1

Visit our website at www.fennvillegoosefesival.com for the latest updates GOOSE FESTIVALLEADERS OF YESTERYEAR Lexis Wilson Missie Latham Kym Zumbrink Christie VanderBok Tom Tucker They’ll lead the parade as this year’s Grand Marshals! By Colleen Rae Hayley Saintz Mady VanHowe The Fennville Goose Festivals over the years has had a few different Chairpersons that have directed, brain- stormed, molded, and created the various events and activities that have made the festival the unique and de- lightful celebration that it has become today. The very first Chairperson was Kym Zumbrink. The town of Fennville needed some help in ‘sprucing up.’ Kym decided that getting the train to stop again was a good way of accomplishing this. In trying to secure a stop in Fennville by AMTRAK a reason was needed. “In negotiations with MDOT,” says Kym, “I was Alaina Harris Katie DeJonge asked what Fennville was known for, and I replied, ‘Geese.’ The MDOT representative flippantly said, ‘why don’t you have a Goose Festival. The train will stop for that!’ He was half-kidding but I presented the idea to They’re Baaaaaahhaaaaaack! the Fennville Chamber and agreed to chair the project. The idea was to restore the service that used to bring Chi- cago tourists and second homeowners to the area.” “The first train that stopped, ‘Arnold’ got off, which was a mistake, but he became a kind of folk legend”, says Kym. “John and Joan VanVoorhees played music on the train and Miss Fennville served cider to the passengers.” The rest is history and the Goose Festival became a tradition in Fennville. Almost immediately Kym enlisted Clifford Paine to help her. From the very beginning she, Cliff and Joanne Moore were the movers and shakers that made the origi- nal festival in 1984 a sizzling success. However, Kym is quick to add there were many volunteers that helped, and this still exists today. See “Grand Marshals” page 6 Entertainment Highlights Marking Our Silver Anniversary By Tom Tucker By popular demand and after a five year hiatus the clown band will perform again at this year’s Goose Festi- val. The Scottville Clown Band has been entertaining audiences and parade watchers since 1903. Starting with a dozen or so musicians, primarily local merchants and business folk, they formed a loose knit group dressing up as clowns, tramps and ladies to play at the Scottsville Harvest Festival, other local festivals and county fairs. The group played now and then until the call to service in World War II. Ray Schulte, a pre-war band member who is known as the Godfather of the band, reorganized the group to play in the 1947 Scottville Harvest Festival and the rest is history. See “Clown Band” page 15 INDEX Los Bandits Article ………... 2 Queen/Princess Article ……. 3 Goose Festival Sponsors …... 4 Discovery Dance Article ..… 4 Kids Talent Show Signup ..... 4 Commercial Vendor App .... 5 Craft Show App ………….... 5 Gosling Run Map & App …. 7 Funktion Article …………... 7 5K Run Map & App ………. 9 Diego Soulz Article ……….. 10 Kid Talent Show App …….. 11 Children’s Parade App ...… 12 Pet Show App …………...… 12 Stage Schedule …………….. 15 Festival SiteMap ……..….... 16 Festival T-Shirts ……….….. 17 Festival Events . ..……….… 18, 19

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THEY'LL LEAD THE PARADE AS THIS YEAR'S GRAND MARSHALS !

COLLEEN RAE

The Fennville Goose Festivals over the years has had a few different Chairpersons that have directed, brainstormed, molded, and created the various events and activities that have made the festival the unique and delightful celebration that it has become today.<br /> <br /> The very first Chairperson was Kym Zumbrink. The town of Fennville needed some help in ‘sprucing up.’ Kym decided that getting the train to stop again was a good way of accomplishing this. In trying to secure a stop in Fennville by AMTRAK a reason was needed.<br /> <br /> “In negotiations with MDOT,” says Kym, “I was asked what Fennville was known for, and I replied, ‘Geese.’ The MDOT representative flippantly said, ‘why don’t you have a Goose Festival. The train will stop for that!’ He was half-kidding but I presented the idea to the Fennville Chamber and agreed to chair the project. The idea was to restore the service that used to bring Chicago tourists and second homeowners to the area.”<br /> <br /> “The first train that stopped, ‘Arnold’ got off, which was a mistake, but he became a kind of folk legend”, says Kym. “John and Joan VanVoorhees played music on the train and Miss Fennville served cider to the passengers.”<br /> <br /> The rest is history and the Goose Festival became a tradition in Fennville. <br /> <br /> Almost immediately Kym enlisted Clifford Paine to help her. From the very beginning she, Cliff and Joanne Moore were the movers and shakers that made the original festival in 1984 a sizzling success. However, Kym is quick to add there were many volunteers that helped, and this still exists today.<br /> <br /> “The three of us, Cliff, Joanne and myself, brainstormed and came up with – the Mother Goose Story Hour, Goose Cooking Contest, the 5-K Run, the Floyd R. Turbo look-alike contest, (we got permission from Johnny Carson to do this), and the Goose Ball with a Goose-Calling contest at the ball,” continues Kym.<br /> <br /> “Joanne was an amazing worker; she was in charge of the juried Arts and Crafts. She did anything I ask of her.”<br /> <br /> “Sue Parks did a terrific job organizing the Wildlife Art Show at the Citizens Bank. There were student exhibits as well as Wildlife Artists including Steve French and the late Bruce Mattson. Steve French participated in the first few art events and then started doing his famous ‘geese’ posters for the festival.”<br /> <br /> “The Parade went around the block twice, and we had the Clown Band, and a marching unit called the Goose Boosters. We marched to the music of the Ghostbusters, and Kathy Kirby led us in a marching routine. We even wore feathered boas,” Kym reminisces. “We started the first raffle, and the merchants in town agreed to be our sponsors. If not for them, we wouldn’t have had a first Goose Festival. They were very supportive of the festival.” Kym continues,<br /> <br /> Kym remembers, “We didn’t have any music on stage in those first years, in fact we didn’t have a stage. It was a ton of fun and a definitely boost for Fennville. Someone sent a tee-shirt to Barb Comeau with a slightly naughty connotation and I changed the wording to, “Get Your Goose in Fennville” which became the first tee-shirt designed for the festival.”<br /> <br /> “We initially thought to attract the hunters during hunting season, and their wives to the festival, but it became so popular it was difficult for the hunters to get into town.”<br /> <br /> “My Dad, Charles Dickinson won the raffle a couple of years and I was embarrassed about that. He won because he bought so many tickets. My Dad and Bob, my husband, as well as the entire hardware staff were very supportive of my work on the festival. Our little town began getting favorable press, both regionally and nationally. We were mentioned on Johnny Carson’s Tonight Show, and the Today Show, and in papers from New York, Chicago, to San Francisco.”<br /> <br /> After the first year, Kym co-chaired the festival with Clifford Paine, who was editor of the Fennville Herald at the time. Joanne owned the Tasty Treet; they were all three busy people but found enough time to produce the Goose Festival for seven more years.<br /> <br /> In 1992 Tom Tucker took over the Goose Festival as Chairperson. He tells a funny story about how he became Chair. Cliff Paine had talked to Tom about becoming Chair but nothing was finalized.<br /> <br /> The last two years of Cliff’s tenure as Chairperson, Tom had helped him out. Tom’s main job was to put up plywood signs along Main Street with the sponsors and events listed.<br /> <br /> In January of 1992, the Chamber of Commerce met at the Blue Goose Restaurant for a meeting.<br /> <br /> “Out of the blue,” says Tom, “Cliff stood up and said, ‘this year I want to turn over the leadership of the Goose Festival to Tom Tucker.’ Everyone clapped and I was very surprised.”<br /> <br /> Tom remembers that the Goose Gazette was in its infancy then. He did most of the articles and lay outs for the paper.<br /> <br /> Tom points out he had many wonderful volunteers. The first year that Tom was Chairperson Mary Lou Bailey was in charge of the Arts and Crafts, with Evelyn Charles.<br /> <br /> “Sally Cassell helped me a lot,” says Tom.<br /> <br /> Some of the other volunteers for the year of 1992 were: Corinne Pope, Ed Smiertka, Joe Simon – Wild Goose Chase, Edna Alexander – festival merchandise, Kathy McGee, Dawn Wilkinson, Chris Aguilar, Polly Gurdink, John Darling, Pam Schut, Bob Bushee, Bob McCracken, Judy Kratzer, Joanne Tucker, Charles Dickinson, Sandy Schlack, Tom Chatman, Shirley Witt, Elice Menear, Mary Ann Moeller, John Schlack Jr., Margaret Sessions and Kathy Barnes.<br /> <br /> The Amtrak would stop in Fennville for the passengers to disembark for the Goose Festival. They would be met at the station by a group of festival people. S3<br /> <br /> Some of the events that were part of the Goose Festival then were: The Welcome Arnold Nelson Party at the Stevens Hotel, An Artist’s Reception, Floyd R. Turbo Trophy Look-a-Like Contest, an Arts and Crafts Show, a Saw Mill Demonstration, the Car Show, the Wildlife Art Show, Chairs, Sue Clark and Jackie Ladwein. More events were: The Mule Team Wagon Rides, the Needlework Art Competition, the Campbell’s 10,000 Meter Run Wild Goose Chase, Mother Goose Story Hour, and the Loose Goose Trolley, which was run by Joanne Tucker for eight years.<br /> <br /> On stage could be seen: Dick Gurn and the Music Makers, Midnight Bandit Band, playing country music, Saugatuck Community Jazz Band, Scottville Clown Band, the Tulip Town Tuners, the Golden Goose Raffle, the Great Lakes Canada Goose and Mallard Duck Calling, Band Boosters Junior Goose Ball, the Kal Creek Kickers, a dance group, with Jimmy Cox as MC.<br /> <br /> “Sally Cassell and I used to call on different restaurants on Friday nights at the Stevens Hotel, especially. Everyone was a sitting duck. We sold lots of tickets,” says Tom.<br /> <br /> Tom remembers the year 1995. “On Friday night of the festival we lacked about $3000 in paying off the cost of the truck we were raffling off. Sally and I enlisted all of the volunteers, gave them a fistful of tickets, and told them to go out and sell them. By noon on Saturday we had collected enough money to pay off the truck and we had money left over.”<br /> <br /> This is a great example of team work that existed within the Goose Festival committee.<br /> <br /> Tom says, “the truck was one of the memorable events in the history of the Golden Goose Raffle.<br /> <br /> In 1997, Tom says, “there were three small, motoreddriven light aircraft that looked like birds flying all up and down Main Street about 700 feet above the town. People were waving at them. Everyone thought it was me that arranged this publicity; it was not, and I never found out who was responsible. We coordinated with the Hollywood movie, Fly Away Home, which was the theme of the Goose Festival that year. Some of the town people went to Ann Arbor to see the film.”<br /> <br /> Tom sums up his eight-year tenure as Chair of the Goose Festival. “The Truck Raffle and the effort to get it paid for, plus the Fly Away Home festival were the highlights of my time as chair of the Fennville Goose Festival.<br /> <br /> Christie Vander Bok started working on the Goose Festival in 1993, and was a Board member in 1994. She worked with Tom Pantelleria on the Parade. The last two years of Tom Tucker’s tenure, Christie co-chaired with him.<br /> <br /> “Sarah Clark was a great help to me,” says Christie. “She was our financial genius. Sarah kept track of the money and let us know what we could spend. Also Sally Cassell helped a great deal, as well as Joyce Turner who did the Arts and Crafts the entire time I was Chair.”<br /> <br /> “The Fire Department, especially Duncan McCall was a tremendous help and vital to the festival. Whatever I asked Duncan to do he would have it done before I finished the sentence. He set up and cleaned up and got the Boy Scouts to help. My Dad was a fireman for 20 years. He was very important to these guys and my Dad thought highly of them. They took care of me as always with no hesitation.”<br /> <br /> “Tom Pantelleria was in charge of the Parade the entire time I was Chair. He did a great job.”<br /> <br /> “Gary Tuhecek was a great help too. Anything I asked Gary to do, he did.”<br /> <br /> The events that Christie included in the festival were the Clown Band, the Pony Rides, and she was responsible for getting the first stage from Grand Haven. She had seen it used in Holland and contacted the people to rent it for the Goose Festival.<br /> <br /> “Some of the acts we had were Miranda, and Bozo, the Clown. I was able to go to his show on TV and I took my son when he was little. I got to assist in the Bucket Bonanza on the show and my son participated. That was great fun.”<br /> <br /> Other events Christie arranged were Amtrak train rides on Friday nights and kid’s rides on the train on Sunday mornings.<br /> <br /> “We would schedule Murder Mystery Dinners at the Fenn Valley Winery for fund raising for the festival. The winery would donate their dining room for this event. Another fund raiser we had was the dunk tank at the fire station. We raised lots of money for the festival.”<br /> <br /> “In 2005, we started the kid’s talent show. We had a kid’s pumpkin decoration contest. They would bring their pumpkins on Friday and we would give the prizes out on Sunday afternoon. During the festival the stage would be decorated with the pumpkins. We also had a Goose- Calling demonstration with Todd Aloff as coordinator.<br /> Lori Schut and I started the Gosling Run. In addition, we included a Miss Fennville Scholarship Pageant that was independent of the festival but occurred at the same time.”<br /> <br /> “During the last years I was doing the festival I couldn’t find individuals to take an event and be in charge of it, so I would get everything organized and then when the weekend of the festival arrived the volunteers would show up and take charge. I never had a volunteer not show up. And if I had forgotten anything Duncan came to my rescue.”<br /> <br /> The final year for Christie was 2006. She put out the word that she would not Chair the event the following year. This year, 2009, is the Silver Anniversary, the 25th year for the Fennville Goose Festival. May it continue another twenty-five years.

THEY’RE BAAAAAAHHAAAAAACK!

TOM TUCKER

By popular demand and after a five year hiatus the clown band will perform again at this year’s Goose Festival. The Scottville Clown Band has been entertaining audiences and parade watchers since 1903. Starting with a dozen or so musicians, primarily local merchants and business folk, they formed a loose knit group dressing up as clowns, tramps and ladies to play at the Scottsville Harvest Festival, other local festivals and county fairs.<br /> <br /> The group played now and then until the call to service in World War II. Ray Schulte, a pre-war band member who is known as the Godfather of the band, reorganized the group to play in the 1947 Scottville Harvest Festival and the rest is history.<br /> <br /> The band now performs in an average of 50 events a year and membership includes musicians from all around Michigan and sprinkled across the nation. The mix includes students and U.S. servicemen as well as professionals, workers and retirees from every job imaginable.<br /> <br /> The band starts rehearsals in mid February. The performance season of parades, concerts and shows runs into late fall. The Scottville Clown Band is a registered nonprofit corporation in the State of Michigan. No member is paid for performing. Income earned from performances and the sale of souvenir merchandise goes to play operating expenses and supports the service projects of the band.<br /> <br /> Those projects include the Raymond L. Schulte Music Scholarship Fund, the Museum of Music located at White Pine Village just south of Ludington, MI and the Clown Band Shell in Scottville, MI, a joint effort of the Scottville Optimist club, the Scottville C of C and the Scottville Clown Band.<br /> <br /> For more information about the Scottville Clown Band check their website www.scottvilleclownband.com or email Charlie Weber at clweber@chartermi.net.

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