South Haven Observer July 10, 2009 : Page 3

July 10, 2009 The Observer Page 5 Park Issues Dominate SH Council Workshop Session asked the city to specify that the date Lewis Mitchell Correspondent The South Haven City Council met on Monday evening for its regular workshop and council meeting and the parks discussion dominated both sessions. There was one member absent from the first session, but all were present for the regular meeting. The workshop opened with a discussion regarding the South Haven Area Regional Park (SHARP) and what the deadline is for repay- ment to the city for the purchase of the land in Casco Township. The original agreement said that repay- ment was to be made by July 2009, but did not specify a particular day of the month. The original agreement was made at a council meeting in May 2007. If the repayment of the debt is not met the land will become the property of the city. Members of the group is July 31st. City Manager Brian Dissette told the council members that the volunteers working on the fundaising lack $100,000 of meeting the purchase price of $424,185.59. He said that there has been $35,000 raised in the past week. John Canonie asked the board what happens if the amount is not met by July 31 and Mayor Dorothy Appleyard said that the city has no plan. He added that it is a long way to the park and he believes that eventually the park will go to the school system and that there will be additional taxes to support it. He also said that the pro- posed park is outside the county and taxpayer’s money was loaned with no interest. Dissette said that they are asking for a regional authority to be formed that will oversee the park. The city has not been losing money on the property because it is rented out for farm use. Mayor Appleyard said, “We did not have all of our ducks in place when we started, but I hope that going forward we will do better.” In the regular meeting, with all present, it was reported that the city is working to attempt to organize a regional authority with surrounding townships. Volunteers said that they now have pledges in place for half of the outstanding balance. All members voted to use the last day of July as the due date. In the other item on the agenda of the workshop, the subject of the linear park on the Dunkley Avenue property that the city owns once again came to the forefront. The issue is to have the legal descriptions of the five pieces of the city owned land made and whether it should include a piece along the river only, or of all of it. Dissette told the council that in order to put any of the parcels into the city’s park system there needs to be a legal description of each. One of the parcels - about a third of an acre - runs along the river from a marina on the east to join with the Black River Park on the west. Another parcel includes the former city utilities building and a small tract of land that covers almost half an acre. The city engineers gave a report on the building, which was built in 1947. The building, now leased by Barney Pero for his marina purposes, is located in the flood plain and has some overall damage such as broken windows and electrical deteri- oration. They reported that the build- ing appears to be suitable for nothing but boat storage at the present time. City Engineer Steve Oosting said he is not sure how to renovate the building other than remove it and build new on the old foundation although that would take increasing the base height to meet flood plain requirements. The topic carried over into the regular meeting as the council continued to discuss the issue and how many parcels needed to have the legal descriptions at this time. Dissette told them the survey will cost about $250 for each parcel and that if any of them were to be divided in the future it would have to be done again. He suggested only the area along the river be done. Don Bemis said that the city needs to keep the property along the river and should direct Dissette to obtain the description of that parcel and lock it into the parks system. Mayor Appleyard said, “The city doesn’t have a plan for the area, but if it is in the city’s parks sys- tem it could be leased. It is best for the city to keep ownership and (for it) to be a park.” Scott Smith replied, “Lock in the river frontage and then get a plan in place.” Suzie Fitzgibbon moved to amend the motion so that the survey includes parcels along the river and the building, but that was defeated in a four-to-three vote. She then again moved to include all five parcels and the coun- cil permit options for commercial use. This passed by the same margin. SH’s Our Town Players Present “Little Shop Of Horrors” Sandra Tyrrell Correspondent It will be soon be “another openin’ of another show” for Our Town Players of South Haven. As the curtain rises at 7:30 p.m., July 24 at Listiak Auditorium, Crystal, Ronnette and Chiffon, played by Chelsea Hagger, Stacey Sterkenburg, and Emily Verdonk, croon in harmony the title song, “Little Shop of Horrors.” They warn the audience to beware of the dangers that will happen in the course of the story. The musical, based on the 1960 film by Roger Corman with screenplay by Charles Griffith, cen- ters around a florist shop worker, Seymour, who raises a plant that feeds on human blood. Eventually, it grows into an ill-tempered R&B-singing carnivore, which offers Seymour fame and for- tune in exchange for feeding its grow- ing appetite. Little Shop of Horrors had its world premiere in May 1982 at the WPA Theatre. Then it opened off- Broadway at the Orpheum Theatre on July 27, 1982. When it closed on November 1, 1987, after 2,209 per- formances, it was the third-longest running musical and the highest –grossing production in off- Broadway history. Books and Lyrics were writ- ten by Howard Ashman, and the music was composed by Alan Menken. Director Tracey Davis says, “I am having fun working with this very talented, small cast and it’s a fun show to direct. There are lots of sur- prises in the story.” Cast members recommend that people see the show more than once to catch all the innuendos. Davis and Music Director Ben Beck traveled to Illinois to pick up the blood-sucking plant called Audrey II. The rotund plant wouldn’t fit into a regular van so they rented a truck. It was a 12-hour day, notes Davis. Assisting Davis and Beck is Julie Zucker, Choreographer and Scott Wall, Stage Manager. John Linstrom and Neil Lundgren are the puppeteers for Audrey II from a little plant to a big one. Caleb Wolfe as the love-sick Seymour Krelbourn wrestles with his conscience, unsure whether he should feed the plant in order to fulfill his dreams or remain a poor young man, an orphan, living in urban skid row. Susanna Allen, who por- trays the vulnerable Audrey, works with Seymour at Mushnik’s Skid Row Florists. Audrey and Seymour lament their station in life and seek a life away from the urban blight. She per- “Resort Memories” Presented July 14th By The Historical Association Of South Haven The Historical Association of South Haven will offer a slide presentation entitled “Resort Memories” at 7 p.m. on Tuesday, July 14. Narrated by Lee Niffenegger, the program will focus on the Jewish resort era in South Haven and how it evolved from the early farm resorts. The slide pres- entation will take place at the Hartman School building located at 355 Hubbard St. in South Haven. The school will open at 6 p.m. so that vis- itors can enjoy the current exhibits . Those showings will include “Central School: A Prelude – 1857-1926” and “Snapshot: South Haven 1956 – The Photographs of Richard Appleyard.” The program is open to the public and light refreshments will be served to all who attend this fun and memorable event. For more infor- mation about the presen- tation, please call 269- 637-6424. forms some of the most memorable songs from the show: “Somewhere that’s Green” and Suddenly Seymour”. Dick Allen (Susanna’s father) plays Mr. Mushnik, the cigar smoking, cranky, over-bearing owner of Mushnik’s Florists, who keeps encouraging Seymour to feed Audrey II who appears mysteriously in Seymour’s life after a sudden eclipse of the sun. Seymour, secretly in love with Audrey, names it Audrey II in her honor. Through a quirk of fate, Seymour learns the plant needs blood to survive. The plant gets bigger and bigger, creating substantial business for Mr. Mushnik. Eventually, Seymour can’t provide enough blood to keep Audrey II healthy. When he stops feeding it, Audrey II reveals that it can speak in a deep demanding voice, and by feed- ing it, all of Seymour’s dreams will come true. Gerald Hopson lends his bass voice for the giant Audrey II, who demands Seymour to, “Feeeed me.” Jeff Carey likes his role as Orin the Dentist (note his antique dentist’s chair) who is Audrey’s nasty boyfriend. His character is modeled after “Leader of the Pack” characters of the 1950s. Audrey reveals to Seymour she is not happy with Orin and she secretly has feelings for Seymour. Her ultimate dream is to have an ideal suburban life with him, complete with a tract home, frozen dinners and plastic on the furniture. Other cast members play- ing important parts in the intricate story are Morgan Darke and Stef Frith - Chorus, Eddie Verdonk - Chorus and Interviewer, and Logan Witt - Customer and bum. Little Shop of Horrors runs July 24-26, July 31-Aug. 2, and Aug. 7-8 at Listiak Auditorium, located at the west end of South Haven High School, 600 Elkenburg Street. Friday and Saturday shows begin at 7:30 p.m. and the Sunday matinees are at 3 p.m. Tickets may be purchased online at www.ourtownplayers.org and downtown South Haven at Wolverine Hardware, or at the door on performance dates. Fee: adults, $12; seniors 65 and over, $10; stu- dents 12 and up, $10; and youth under 12, $6. For more information, or email: info@ourtownplayers.org send a post: P.O. Box 94, South Haven, MI 49090 or call (269) 639- 8228.

PARK ISSUES DOMINATE SH COUNCIL WORKSHOP SESSION

LEWIS MITCHELL

The South Haven City Council met on Monday evening for its regular workshop and council meeting and the parks discussion dominated both sessions.<br /> <br /> There was one member absent from the first session, but all were present for the regular meeting.<br /> <br /> The workshop opened with a discussion regarding the South Haven Area Regional Park (SHARP) and what the deadline is for repayment to the city for the purchase of the land in Casco Township. The original agreement said that repayment was to be made by July 2009, but did not specify a particular day of the month.<br /> <br /> The original agreement was made at a council meeting in May<br /> <br /> 2007. If the repayment of the debt is not met the land will become the property of the city.<br /> <br /> Members of the group asked the city to specify that the date is July 31st. City Manager Brian Dissette told the council members that the volunteers working on the fundaising lack $100,000 of meeting the purchase price of $424,185.59. He said that there has been $35,000 raised in the past week.<br /> <br /> John Canonie asked the board what happens if the amount is not met by July 31 and Mayor Dorothy Appleyard said that the city has no plan.<br /> <br /> He added that it is a long way to the park and he believes that eventually the park will go to the school system and that there will be additional taxes to support it.<br /> <br /> He also said that the proposed park is outside the county and taxpayer’s money was loaned with no interest.<br /> <br /> Dissette said that they are asking for a regional authority to be formed that will oversee the park. The city has not been losing money on the property because it is rented out for farm use.<br /> <br /> Mayor Appleyard said, “We did not have all of our ducks in place when we started, but I hope that going forward we will do better.” In the regular meeting, with all present, it was reported that the city is working to attempt to organize a regional authority with surrounding townships. Volunteers said that they now have pledges in place for half of the outstanding balance. All members voted to use the last day of July as the due date.<br /> <br /> In the other item on the agenda of the workshop, the subject of the linear park on the Dunkley Avenue property that the city owns once again came to the forefront. The issue is to have the legal descriptions of the five pieces of the city owned land made and whether it should include a piece along the river only, or of all of it.<br /> <br /> Dissette told the council that in order to put any of the parcels into the city’s park system there needs to be a legal description of each. One of the parcels - about a third of an acre - runs along the river from a marina on the east to join with the Black River Park on the west.<br /> <br /> Another parcel includes the former city utilities building and a small tract of land that covers almost half an acre. The city engineers gave a report on the building, which was built in 1947. The building, now leased by Barney Pero for his marina purposes, is located in the flood plain and has some overall damage such as broken windows and electrical deterioration.<br /> <br /> They reported that the building appears to be suitable for nothing but boat storage at the present time.<br /> <br /> City Engineer Steve Oosting said he is not sure how to renovate the building other than remove it and build new on the old foundation although that would take increasing the base height to meet flood plain requirements.<br /> <br /> The topic carried over into the regular meeting as the council continued to discuss the issue and how many parcels needed to have the legal descriptions at this time.<br /> <br /> Dissette told them the survey will cost about $250 for each parcel and that if any of them were to be divided in the future it would have to be done again.<br /> <br /> He suggested only the area along the river be done.<br /> <br /> Don Bemis said that the city needs to keep the property along the river and should direct Dissette to obtain the description of that parcel and lock it into the parks system.<br /> <br /> Mayor Appleyard said, “The city doesn’t have a plan for the area, but if it is in the city’s parks system it could be leased. It is best for the city to keep ownership and (for it) to be a park.” Scott Smith replied, “Lock in the river frontage and then get a plan in place.” Suzie Fitzgibbon moved to amend the motion so that the survey includes parcels along the river and the building, but that was defeated in a four-to-three vote.<br /> <br /> She then again moved to include all five parcels and the council permit options for commercial use.<br /> <br /> This passed by the same margin.

SH’S OUR TOWN PLAYERS PRESENT “LITTLE SHOP OF HORRORS”

SANDRA TYRRELL

It will be soon be “another openin’ of another show” for Our Town Players of South Haven.<br /> <br /> As the curtain rises at 7:30<br /> <br /> p. m., July 24 at Listiak Auditorium, Crystal, Ronnette and Chiffon, played by Chelsea Hagger, Stacey Sterkenburg, and Emily Verdonk, croon in harmony the title song, “Little Shop of Horrors.” They warn the audience to beware of the dangers that will happen in the course of the story.<br /> <br /> The musical, based on the 1960 film by Roger Corman with screenplay by Charles Griffith, centers around a florist shop worker, Seymour, who raises a plant that feeds on human blood.<br /> <br /> Eventually, it grows into an ill-tempered R&B-singing carnivore, which offers Seymour fame and fortune in exchange for feeding its growing appetite.<br /> <br /> Little Shop of Horrors had its world premiere in May 1982 at the WPA Theatre. Then it opened off- Broadway at the Orpheum Theatre on July 27, 1982. When it closed on November 1, 1987, after 2,209 performances, it was the third-longest running musical and the highest –grossing production in off- Broadway history.<br /> <br /> Books and Lyrics were written by Howard Ashman, and the music was composed by Alan Menken.<br /> <br /> Director Tracey Davis says, “I am having fun working with this very talented, small cast and it’s a fun show to direct. There are lots of surprises in the story.” Cast members recommend that people see the show more than once to catch all the innuendos.<br /> <br /> Davis and Music Director Ben Beck traveled to Illinois to pick up the blood-sucking plant called Audrey II. The rotund plant wouldn’t fit into a regular van so they rented a truck. It was a 12-hour day, notes Davis. Assisting Davis and Beck is Julie Zucker, Choreographer and Scott Wall, Stage Manager.<br /> <br /> John Linstrom and Neil Lundgren are the puppeteers for Audrey II from a little plant to a big one.<br /> <br /> Caleb Wolfe as the love-sick Seymour Krelbourn wrestles with his conscience, unsure whether he should feed the plant in order to fulfill his dreams or remain a poor young man, an orphan, living in urban skid row.<br /> <br /> Susanna Allen, who portrays the vulnerable Audrey, works with Seymour at Mushnik’s Skid Row Florists. Audrey and Seymour lament their station in life and seek a life away from the urban blight. She performs some of the most memorable songs from the show: “Somewhere that’s Green” and Suddenly Seymour”.<br /> <br /> Dick Allen (Susanna’s father) plays Mr. Mushnik, the cigar smoking, cranky, over-bearing owner of Mushnik’s Florists, who keeps encouraging Seymour to feed Audrey II who appears mysteriously in Seymour’s life after a sudden eclipse of the sun. Seymour, secretly in love with Audrey, names it Audrey II in her honor.<br /> <br /> Through a quirk of fate, Seymour learns the plant needs blood to survive. The plant gets bigger and bigger, creating substantial business for Mr. Mushnik.<br /> <br /> Eventually, Seymour can’t provide enough blood to keep Audrey II healthy. When he stops feeding it, Audrey II reveals that it can speak in a deep demanding voice, and by feeding it, all of Seymour’s dreams will come true. Gerald Hopson lends his bass voice for the giant Audrey II, who demands Seymour to, “Feeeed me.” Jeff Carey likes his role as Orin the Dentist (note his antique dentist’s chair) who is Audrey’s nasty boyfriend. His character is modeled after “Leader of the Pack” characters of the 1950s. Audrey reveals to Seymour she is not happy with Orin and she secretly has feelings for Seymour. Her ultimate dream is to have an ideal suburban life with him, complete with a tract home, frozen dinners and plastic on the furniture.<br /> <br /> Other cast members playing important parts in the intricate story are Morgan Darke and Stef Frith - Chorus, Eddie Verdonk - Chorus and Interviewer, and Logan Witt - Customer and bum.<br /> <br /> Little Shop of Horrors runs July 24-26, July 31-Aug. 2, and Aug. 7-8 at Listiak Auditorium, located at the west end of South Haven High School, 600 Elkenburg Street. Friday and Saturday shows begin at 7:30p. m. and the Sunday matinees are at 3p. m. Tickets may be purchased online at ww.ourtownplayers.org and downtown South Haven at Wolverine Hardware, or at the door on performance dates. Fee: adults, $12; seniors 65 and over, $10; students 12 and up, $10; and youth under 12, $6.<br /> <br /> For more information, email: info@ourtownplayers.org or send a post: P.O. Box 94, South Haven, MI 49090 or call (269) 6398228.

“RESORT MEMORIES” PRESENTED JULY 14TH BY THE HISTORICAL ASSOCIATION OF SOUTH HAVEN

The Historical Association of South Haven will offer a slide presentation entitled “Resort Memories” at 7 p. m. on Tuesday, July 14.<br /> <br /> Narrated by Lee Niffenegger, the program will focus on the Jewish resort era in South Haven and how it evolved from the early farm resorts.<br /> <br /> The slide presentation will take place at the Hartman School building located at 355 Hubbard St. in South Haven.<br /> <br /> The school will open at 6 p.m. so that visitors can enjoy the current exhibits .<br /> <br /> Those showings will include “Central School: A Prelude – 1857-1926” and “Snapshot: South Haven 1956 – The Photographs of Richard Appleyard.” The program is open to the public and light refreshments will be served to all who attend this fun and memorable event.<br /> <br /> For more information about the presentation, please call 269- 637-6424.

THE JEWISH RESORT ERA

 

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