Montessori Sun Times Winter 2013 : Page 1

A newsletter for The Children’s House community in Traverse City · Winter 2013 www.traversechildrenshouse.org Three reasons why finally becoming one of the “big kids” in the primary wing is such a big deal Ask a child on the cusp of being a kindergarten student at The Children’s House what they’re looking forward to most and the answer you’ll get is probably ice cream and gym class. The annual field trip to MOOmers is pretty important to any child who for years has watched the older students board the bus for an inside tour and a scoop of ice cream at Traverse City’s most famous ice cream spot. And gym class every afternoon — what’s not to love about that? That final year in the Primary Program comes with plenty of perks, but the true payoff hap-pens in the classroom every day. To paraphrase the popular credo, everything you need to know you learn in kindergarten. Here are just a few reasons why, at The Children’s House, that may be truer than you think. Model Students Maria Montessori believed that the final year in the primary cycle was the most important, since so much of what a child is exposed to prior to that time is unattain-able to them until the age of five or six. This motivates the younger child to challenge him or herself so that they will someday be able to do the work of the older child. The final year is so important because it is this period during which everything comes together; it’s the culmination of two or three years of developing into kind, resourceful, self-directed students who are rewarded by being able to lead the class and set an example for the younger students. Big Work During the first two years moving through the Montessori primary curriculum, children simultane-ously develop the social, physical and emotional skills (as well as the self-discipline) that go hand-in-hand with a greater and increasingly complex grasp of classroom academics. But equally as important is the fact that, by the time a child has moved through the entire three-year primary cycle, he/she has enjoyed numerous opportunities to be a leader. Studies have shown that being a role model to younger classmates leads to greater self-esteem. As for the younger children, having older children to look up to is a power-ful motivator for teachers trying to establish powerful character traits in their students. The Perfect Circle As any primary guide at The Children’s House will tell you, the greatest gift in a three-year pri-mary cycle is seeing a classroom come full circle. It happens when the child who entered primary unable to tie his or her shoes one day volunteers to help tie the shoe of someone smaller. It’s the pride older students show when giving a lesson to a younger child that they once remember receiv-ing. It’s the confidence they exude in the knowledge that there isn’t any material on the shelves that they haven’t mastered and that they have, through a lot of hard work, been transformed into the sort of individuals that they look up to and want to emulate. MOOmers and Much More Extended Day student Nora lends a hand to younger primary student, Maggie. Save The Date May 3, 2013 The Annual Children’s House Gala A night of authentic Indian cuisine, live and silent auctions and dancing

Moomers And Much More

Three reasons why finally becoming one of the “big kids” in the primary wing is such a big deal<br /> <br /> Ask a child on the cusp of being a kindergarten student at The Children’s House what they’re looking forward to most and the answer you’ll get is probably ice cream and gym class. The annual field trip to MOOmers is pretty important to any child who for years has watched the older students board the bus for an inside tour and a scoop of ice cream at Traverse City’s most famous ice cream spot. And gym class every afternoon — what’s not to love about that?<br /> <br /> That final year in the Primary Program comes with plenty of perks, but the true payoff happens in the classroom every day. To paraphrase the popular credo, everything you need to know you learn in kindergarten. Here are just a few reasons why, at The Children’s House, that may be truer than you think.<br /> <br /> Model Students<br /> <br /> Maria Montessori believed that the final year in the primary cycle was the most important, since so much of what a child is exposed to prior to that time is unattainable to them until the age of five or six. This motivates the younger child to challenge him or herself so that they will someday be able to do the work of the older child.<br /> <br /> The final year is so important because it is this period during which everything comes together; it’s the culmination of two or three years of developing into kind, resourceful, self-directed students who are rewarded by being able to lead the class and set an example for the younger students.<br /> <br /> Big Work<br /> <br /> During the first two years moving through the Montessori primary curriculum, children simultaneously develop the social, physical and emotional skills (as well as the self-discipline) that go hand-in-hand with a greater and increasingly complex grasp of classroom academics.<br /> <br /> But equally as important is the fact that, by the time a child has moved through the entire threeyear primary cycle, he/she has enjoyed numerous opportunities to be a leader. Studies have shown that being a role model to younger classmates leads to greater self-esteem. As for the younger children, having older children to look up to is a powerful motivator for teachers trying to establish powerful character traits in their students.<br /> <br /> The Perfect Circle<br /> <br /> As any primary guide at The Children’s House will tell you, the greatest gift in a three-year primary cycle is seeing a classroom come full circle. It happens when the child who entered primary unable to tie his or her shoes one day volunteers to help tie the shoe of someone smaller. It’s the pride older students show when giving a lesson to a younger child that they once remember receiving. It’s the confidence they exude in the knowledge that there isn’t any material on the shelves that they haven’t mastered and that they have, through a lot of hard work, been transformed into the sort of individuals that they look up to and want to emulate.

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