Women's Lifestyle Grand Rapids april 2014 : Page 15

Anne Chamberlin: H by Richelle Kimble • photography by Two Eagles Marcus Originally, their goal was to raise $3,000 for the American Cancer Society; after surpassing several altered goals, they raised the bar to $10,000 and are over 90 percent successful, and climbing. “The reason I chose to train for this race was because I want Jenny to see the outpouring of love and donations to our charity of choice. I just want her to see how many people care.” The weekly training program that Chamberlin has set for herself is dramatically different than the two-week chemo routine she was in just months ago. Without the capricious tempo of life that brought her to the ground, she might not have gained the grit to triumph challenges with positivity. The road of sickness stripped her of almost everything, physically and mentally, and it also rewarded her with the understanding of what life is really about: kindness and empathy of others. Without that realization, her battle might not have been successful. “When you’re routinely going on in your life, it’s sometimes difficult to pinpoint happiness. People need to be reminded that there is goodness in your day, you just have to find it.” Positivity is a trait that many cancer survivors embody (and emanate), and Chamberlin is no exception. There is truth in the statement that when mundane factors of your life are limited, you re-gain appreciation for those and beyond. Chamberlin, for example, noted the Christmas she spent in the hospital as one of her favorites. She didn’t have to carry any lipstick in her clutch; she ate meatballs from a crockpot with her warrior companions. Appreciation became more of a routine, and ordinary objects such as the junk drawer in her kitchen became a symbol of comfort. It defined her home, it defined her and her family, and she yearned to have access to that drawer back. These are lessons that Chamberlin wishes to bring awareness to with her Kicking Cancer’s Butt campaign. She wants not only to share that cancer fighters and survivors encircle every community, but to spread the word that joy is everywhere in the simplest of places — a concept that many of those who have been sick seem to see much clearer. While Chamberlin is still in search of how to share the knowledge she has gained from fighting cancer, she feels that she has began her path of fate with this heart-felt run for Jenny, and every other cancer fighter who can’t run. “We have these hidden talents and lessons that we learn from each journey we endure, and we need to figure out what do to with it. We need to use them to better our lives and others,” she said. “You have to learn from your experiences and then use it positively. I’m still trying to figure out exactly how to do that.” You’re invited to join Chamberlin in her bravery by donating to her Team ACS fund. Look for her running through downtown Grand Rapids on May 10, 2014, in the 5/3 River Bank Run. Chamberlin’s 25K run will start at 8:20 am. er Kate Spade purse, poised black knee-high boots or sapphire wedding ring cannot display the amount of vigor residing within her. It is her short brown hair, tinted with grey; her ivory skin that wears wisdom; and her personal port, settled into her skin, situated under her right collarbone and above her breast that radiates her pure sanguine, resilience and joy for life. This cancer fighter’s mission is simply defined: to empower women, raise awareness and spread positive energy. She is marrying her mission with a personal passion for running, and has begun a quest to raise $10,000 for the American Cancer Society. Anne Chamberlin is a Grand Rapids native, a Kenyon College graduate, a wife and mother of four, a survivor of Stage IV Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, and a Fifth Third River Bank Run trainee. She had already been training for the 25K race when she was diagnosed in October 2013. Even though she ceased training during treatment, she was inspired by a fellow cancer fighter to keep her goal of running the race. Her friend’s name is Jenny. Jenny, a fighter of breast and ovarian cancer, is the guiding light for a campaign called I Heart Jenny that has hit nationally. “I Jenny” stickers have landed across landmarks, helmets, mountains and shirtsleeves. Jenny has instilled inspiration by unfurling her joy with endless audiences. She simply lived her life and unintentionally radiated “Jenny magic” to those around her. Chamberlin shares Jenny’s unconquerable energy for life, and while she was at her lowest, sporting her IV pole as her best friend, Chamberlin was lifted by Jenny’s energy. “We all have one thing in common. We’re all going to die, whether it’s from cancer, old age, or a car accident. Coming to grips with that puts you at peace. You have to keep living,” Chamberlin said. Kicking Cancer’s Butt One Mile At a Time Anne Allen Chamberlin http://teamacs.acsevents.org/goto/ anneallenchamberlin The American Cancer Society is dedicated to helping those who face cancer by supporting research, early detection, treatment and education. Anyone can join Team ACS to run in honor of someone, raise awareness or raise funds. Donate Run The 5/3 River Bank Run is the largest 25K road race in the country that features a 25K Handcycle and 25K Wheelchair Race, 10K run, a 25K/10K/5K run team competition, 5K walk and Junior events. For specifics and to register, visit www.53riverbankrun.com. When she’s not editing for WLM and spending time with her fellow staff members, Richelle enjoys exploring, traveling, writing, reading, cooking, learning and playing. Women’s LifeStyle Magazine • April 2014 15

Anne Chamberlin: A Reason To Run

Richelle Kimble

Her Kate Spade purse, poised black kneehigh boots or sapphire wedding ring cannot display the amount of vigor residing within her. It is her short brown hair, tinted with grey; her ivory skin that wears wisdom; and her personal port, settled into her skin, situated under her right collarbone and above her breast that radiates her pure sanguine, resilience and joy for life.<br /> <br /> This cancer fighter’s mission is simply defined: to empower women, raise awareness and spread positive energy. She is marrying her mission with a personal passion for running, and has begun a quest to raise $10,000 for the American Cancer Society.<br /> <br /> Anne Chamberlin is a Grand Rapids native, a Kenyon College graduate, a wife and mother of four, a survivor of Stage IV Non- Hodgkin Lymphoma, and a Fifth Third River Bank Run trainee.<br /> <br /> She had already been training for the 25K race when she was diagnosed in October 2013. Even though she ceased training during treatment, she was inspired by a fellow cancer fighter to keep her goal of running the race. Her friend’s name is Jenny.<br /> <br /> Jenny, a fighter of breast and ovarian cancer, is the guiding light for a campaign called I Heart Jenny that has hit nationally. “I Jenny” stickers have landed across landmarks, helmets, mountains and shirtsleeves. Jenny has instilled inspiration by unfurling her joy with endless audiences. She simply lived her life and unintentionally radiated “Jenny magic” to those around her.<br /> <br /> Chamberlin shares Jenny’s unconquerable energy for life, and while she was at her lowest, sporting her IV pole as her best friend, Chamberlin was lifted by Jenny’s energy.<br /> <br /> “We all have one thing in common. We’re all going to die, whether it’s from cancer, old age, or a car accident. Coming to grips with that puts you at peace.<br /> <br /> You have to keep living,” Chamberlin said.<br /> <br /> Originally, their goal was to raise $3,000 for the American Cancer Society; after surpassing several altered goals, they raised the bar to $10,000 and are over 90 percent successful, and climbing.<br /> <br /> “The reason I chose to train for this race was because I want Jenny to see the outpouring of love and donations to our charity of choice. I just want her to see how many people care.” The weekly training program that Chamberlin has set for herself is dramatically different than the two-week chemo routine she was in just months ago. Without the capricious tempo of life that brought her to the ground, she might not have gained the grit to triumph challenges with positivity. The road of sickness stripped her of almost everything, physically and mentally, and it also rewarded her with the understanding of what life is really about: kindness and empathy of others.<br /> <br /> Without that realization, her battle might not have been successful.<br /> <br /> “When you’re routinely going on in your life, it’s sometimes difficult to pinpoint happiness. People need to be reminded that there is goodness in your day, you just have to find it.” Positivity is a trait that many cancer survivors embody (and emanate), and Chamberlin is no exception. There is truth in the statement that when mundane factors of your life are limited, you re-gain appreciation for those and beyond. Chamberlin, for example, noted the Christmas she spent in the hospital as one of her favorites. She didn’t have to carry any lipstick in her clutch; she ate meatballs from a crockpot with her warrior companions. Appreciation became more of a routine, and ordinary objects such as the junk drawer in her kitchen became a symbol of comfort. It defined her home, it defined her and her family, and she yearned to have access to that drawer back.<br /> <br /> These are lessons that Chamberlin wishes to bring awareness to with her Kicking Cancer’s Butt campaign. She wants not only to share that cancer fighters and survivors encircle every community, but to spread the word that joy is everywhere in the simplest of places — a concept that many of those who have been sick seem to see much clearer.<br /> <br /> While Chamberlin is still in search of how to share the knowledge she has gained from fighting cancer, she feels that she has began her path of fate with this heart-felt run for Jenny, and every other cancer fighter who can’t run.<br /> <br /> “We have these hidden talents and lessons that we learn from each journey we endure, and we need to figure out what do to with it. We need to use them to better our lives and others,” she said. “You have to learn from your experiences and then use it positively.<br /> <br /> I’m still trying to figure out exactly how to do that.” You’re invited to join Chamberlin in her bravery by donating to her Team ACS fund. Look for her running through downtown Grand Rapids on May 10, 2014, in the 5/3 River Bank Run. Chamberlin’s 25K run will start at 8:20 am.<br /> <br />

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